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id like to install linux

Discussion in 'Tech & Programming' started by mapdesigner, Jun 24, 2017.

  1. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    Hello,

    I had the idea to install ubuntu linux. I just wanted to know how to back-up windows (i know i can install ubuntu on windows). I dont remember where I put my back-up CD

    can I back it up in my external hard-disk? is it possible to use the hard disk to install ubunto and still have the windows back-up?

    because last time i installed linux it took over the system restoring from windows.
    or what should I otherwise do?
     
  2. hitsuji

    hitsuji Member

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    I advice you to use a second harddrive or at least create a second partition.

    Then you are able to install ubuntu parallel and have dual boot option.
     
  3. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    do you mean I use another external hard drive? or you mean create another partition in my computer? ubuntu I think does that for me while installing system

    also @Blarrg
     
  4. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    If you didn't make partitions to install Ubuntu when you first installed Windows then you will need another hard drive (external works but its highly recommended to use internal HDDs for operating systems). Download whatever Ubuntu image you need onto a flash drive and boot from the flash drive when you start up your computer instead of your internal HDD (hit F5, F8, F11 after directly after turning on your computer to open boot menu, varies based on motherboard).

    When going through the installation process, Ubuntu should ask you which hard drive to install it on. I don't recommend making new partitions with Windows already installed, could run into some funky issues if you didn't plan this out in the past, its safer to just use another HDD.

    In terms of backup you don't need to. Since it will be on a separate HDD you can just choose which one to boot from whenever you start your computer (you should be able to set a default option in the BIOS).
     
  5. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    No I havent really planned it. I just used disk management tool and althought I have 100+ GB free space, I realized I can only make a new partition of about 1.47GB or something -__-!

    I can clear some files maybe 200GB, but im not sure; would this make enough partition for ubuntu?
     
  6. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    Depends on what you're using it for. The OS itself is only going to be like 10 GB or so. The applications you're going to use it what is going to determine the space you need.
     
  7. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    ah, so you mean if Im doing partitions while installing linux i might be able to do larger space. thats good.
     
  8. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    Once again I don't recommend deleting stuff just so you can have a 200 GB partition for Ubuntu. If you don't leave extra space on your Windows partition it will likely bug out due to lack of memory (many applications use /tmp/ files). If you are worried about memory you should really drop the cash on a new HDD.
     
  9. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    No I just would make partition for ubuntu system. I use the same partition for files for both windows and ubuntu and it is different from ubuntu partition (its the same as windows system and all other files in C). Id just take prolly 10GB or something? just for ubuntu system (dont remember how much I would need)

    but I didnt know why my windows disk management I could only make 1.4GB partition althought I have 100GB free space lol
     
  10. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    You can't just make a partition for the Ubuntu OS. Applications are built and installed based on your OS because they work different under the hood depending on the OS. Just because you have Dota installed on your Windows partition doesn't mean you can open it with Ubuntu booted. Ubuntu will fail to open the application because Dota was installed based off a Windows configuration, not a Linux configuration.

    The only things that could be shared between the two partitions gracefully are standalone files like music or pictures. For example double clicking a .mp3 file on a Mac might open iTunes, while double clicking a .mp3 file on Windows will open Spotify. Both systems have different applications they use to read a .mp3 file.

    As to the partitioning, you probably need to clean up then probably defragment your drive. Disk Utility should allow you to make partitions.
     
  11. Eli_Green

    Eli_Green Member

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    Alternatively you could just use a VM

    Depends on what you want to do with Linux; if it's just small dev within your own github/bitbucket then a VM will be enough
     
  12. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    If you want to go the VM route be aware you will suffer immensely in the FPS department (VMs typically run at 2-10 FPS) and you will use far more RAM.
     
  13. Eli_Green

    Eli_Green Member

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    what the hell are you running your VMs on or doing with yout VMs that your getying that piss poor performance?

    Even my shitty 6 year old laptop can run a ubuntu VM with no noticable framerate drops relative to the host machine...
     
  14. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    It depends on his GPU, if he has something that is top of the line and can spare the memory for the VM then he will see little performance drop. Judging from his posts it sounds like he wants to run the same applications as he does on Windows, if any of them are GPU intensive it will cause a sharp drop.
     
    Eli_Green likes this.
  15. Eli_Green

    Eli_Green Member

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    True, but if you just wanted to run the same shit as you were before I would question OPs need for using the experiment.

    If you're not going to be doing things that leverage Linux's strengths there's little reason to have both it and another OS.

    Unless it is your preferred OS and/or your machine isn't a linux machine to begin with.

    @mapdesigner explaining what you hope to accomplish with Ubuntu clearly is the only way to make this discussion helpful to you.
     
  16. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    I just thought windows sucks and I always have these system processes that soak up disk speed and sometimes even memory or CPU

    but before I do that I will prolly save a recovery in hard disk or something. I still havent figured out how to save recovery :p
     
  17. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    Processes like what? Those background processes run for a reason, unless they aren't actually system processes like you're saying.
     
  18. dewouter

    dewouter Moderator Staff Member

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    Unused memory is a waste, that's why those applications take as much as they can. When running out of it they will start using less. Windows 10 is very good and I wouldn't recommend you starting on Linux since it seems like you will have a very hard time with it.